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Hilary's Desk

Whooping cough - the infection

Hilary Butler - Thursday, May 31, 2012

What you need to know:  In terms of infection, these three attachments are worth reading  Whooping cough was once called Haemophilus Pertussis, as per the Harrison 7th edition, and is now called Bordetella Pertussis:

Pertussis Crowcroft 2006

Pertussis Hallander 12 sweden

Pertussis Harrison 77, 7th Edition.

In terms of management of the infection, this thread is where you can glean the most practical information.

http://beyondvaccination.com/showthread.php?349-Got-whooping-cough-The-symptoms-Vitamin-C-and-general-management.

However, let's discuss one aspect here:

Whooping cough is spread by carriers.  The real world reality, is that most of the carriers of whooping cough don't know they have it; most are asymptomatic (no symptoms) and most often parents don't know their children have it until about four to six weeks AFTER they first contacted it:

Looking at the time frames, incubation is listed as 5 - 15 days .  This is followed by an insignificant cold which lasts about a week, then goes away = 12 - 22 days.

After about a one week pause, = 19 - 31 days, the cough starts.

Most parents don't get concerned until about two weks into the cough, when it's getting worse, and NOT going away.

So usually a parent doesn't usually get the child to the doctor until around 33 - 45 days after initial contact.

Antibiotics are "said" to be able to reduce the symptoms if they are taken within three weeks of the first contact.

However, if you don't know when or where your first contact was, diagnosis is usually made well after the three week period stated in the medical literature.  AFTER that time, the medical literature clearly shows that antibiotics made whooping cough worse, and prolong the duration.

Nevertheless, it's very common for people who are prescribed antibiotics more than three weeks after contact, to praise the antibiotics for reducing it to just a serious disease.  They proudly say, "Oh, but if I hadn't taken antibiotics, I might have died."  That is a totally unproveable, brainwashed assumption.

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